Skip to main content
Menu
0 items

Haynes On Demand sales are currently limited to residents of the United Kingdom only.

Brakes, suspension & tyres Ford Ka 1996 - 2004 Petrol 1.3 ENDURA-E

OnDemand step-by-step maintenance & repair BETA

Ford Ka 1996 - 2004  | 1.3 ENDURA-E Brakes, suspension & tyres

  • time 20 minutes
  • difficulty 3
Start with the front wheels
With the wheel off the ground, check for wear in the wheel hub bearings by grasping the wheel and trying to rock it. Very slight play is OK, but if the movement is appreciable, you should seek further advice
Now remove the wheel
Check condition of the brake discs. Some light scoring is normal on the area in contact with the brake pads, but if heavy scoring and/or cracks are found on the disc or around the wheel bolt holes, the disc must be renewed. ALWAYS replace both front discs & pads
Now locate the brake pads, there are two, one on each side of the disc. Locate the brake pad's wearing surface, it's the wear material that is pressed against the brake disc to slow the vehicle when the brake pedal is applied
Using a ruler, measure the approximate thickness of the remaining wear material on the brake pad. If it is less than 2.0mm, all front pads need replacement. If you need to replace the front pads, click below
- Close + Open

Front brake pads replacement

Warning: Renew BOTH sets of front brake pads at the same time - NEVER renew the pads on only one wheel, as uneven braking may result. Note that although Ford brake pads do not contain asbestos, the dust created by wear of non-genuine pads may be a health hazard. Do not use compressed air to blow out brake dust and debris - use a brush. Avoid inhaling any of the dust, and wear an approved filtration mask. Use only proprietary brake cleaner fluid or methylated spirits to clean the brake components, DO NOT use petrol or any other petroleum-based product as this will damage the rubber seals.
1 Chock the rear wheels, apply the handbrake, then jack up the front of the vehicle and support it on axle stands. Remove the front roadwheels.
2 If the clip or screw is missing, use a wheel nut to retain the disc.
3 Using a flat-bladed screwdriver, carefully prise the pad spring out from the caliper noting its correct fitted position (see illustration) .
Prising the pad spring from the caliper
4 Remove the plastic covers from the ends of the guide bushes to gain access to the caliper guide pin bolts (see illustration) .
Prise out the plastic covers . . .
5 Slacken and remove the guide pin bolts, then lift the caliper assembly away from the disc (see illustrations) . Suspend the caliper from suspension strut coil spring using a suitable piece of wire or string; do not allow the caliper to hang down by the hose.
. . . then slacken . . .
. . . and remove the guide pin bolts . . .
. . . and lift the caliper from the disc
6 Remove the outer pad from the caliper mounting bracket, then unclip the inner pad from the caliper piston (see illustrations) .
Remove the outer pad from the caliper mounting bracket . . .
. . . then unclip the inner pad from the caliper piston
7 Measure the thickness of the friction material on each brake pad (see illustration) . If either pad is worn at any point to 1.5 mm thickness or less, all four pads must be renewed. Also, the pads should be renewed if any are fouled with oil or grease; there is no satisfactory way of degreasing friction material, once contaminated. If any of the brake pads are worn unevenly, or are fouled with oil or grease, trace and rectify the cause before reassembly.
Measure the thickness of the brake pad friction material
8 If the brake pads are still serviceable, carefully clean them using a clean, fine wire brush or similar, paying particular attention to the sides and back of the metal backing plate. Clean out the grooves in the friction material, and pick out any large embedded particles of dirt or debris. Carefully clean the pad locations in the caliper and piston.
9 Brush the dust and dirt from the caliper and piston, but do not inhale it, as it is injurious to health. Inspect the dust seal around the piston for damage, and the piston for evidence of fluid leaks, corrosion or damage.
10 Prior to fitting the pads, check that the guide pin bolts are a reasonably tight-fit in the caliper bushes. If there is any sign of excessive freeplay between either bush and bolt, both the bushes and bolts should be renewed - the bushes are a push-fit in the caliper body.
11 If new brake pads are to be fitted, the caliper piston must be pushed back into the cylinder to make room for them. Either use a G-clamp or similar tool, or use suitable pieces of wood as levers. Provided that the master cylinder reservoir has not been overfilled with hydraulic fluid, there should be no spillage, but keep a careful watch on the fluid level while retracting the piston. If the fluid level rises above the “MAX” level line at any time, the surplus should be siphoned off, or ejected via a plastic tube connected to one of the bleed screws.
Warning: Do not syphon the fluid by mouth, as it is poisonous; use a syringe or an old poultry baster.
12 Fit the outer pad to the caliper mounting bracket, ensuring that the pad friction material is against the brake disc, then clip the inner pad into position in the caliper piston.
13 Slide the caliper into position over the brake disc, and install the guide pin bolts. Tighten both guide pin bolts to 25 Nm (18 Ibf ft), then refit the plastic caps to the ends of the guide bushes.
14 Engage the pad spring with the outer pad, then engage the spring ends correctly in the caliper body holes, as noted before removal.
15 Depress the brake pedal repeatedly until the pads are pressed into firm contact with the brake disc, and normal (non-assisted) pedal pressure is restored.
16 Repeat the procedure on the remaining front brake caliper.
17 Refit the roadwheels, then lower the vehicle to the ground and tighten the road-wheel nuts to 85 Nm (63 Ibf ft).
18 Check the hydraulic fluid level.
HINT: New pads will not give full braking efficiency until they have bedded in. Be prepared for this,and avoid hard braking as far as possible for the first hundred miles or so after pad renewal.
TIP! Virtually all cars have this inspection window in the brake caliper body, you can usually see the brake pad thickness from here
Now quickly check all the brake pipes for condition, check for any leaks, also inspect the rubber gaitors for integrity. Should the front strut need to be replaced, click below
- Close + Open

Front suspension strut replacement

Removal

1 Apply the handbrake, then jack up the front of the vehicle and support it on axle stands. Remove the relevant roadwheel.
2 On models with ABS, disconnect the sensor wiring and release it from the clips and support bracket, then position it to one side.
3 Carefully release the hydraulic brake hose from the support bracket on the strut. Take care not to damage the rubber grommet.
4 Unscrew the nut and disconnect the anti-roll bar link from the strut (see illustration) .
Unscrew the nut securing the anti-roll bar drop link to the suspension strut
5 Unscrew the bolts securing the brake caliper mounting bracket to the hub carrier, then slide the caliper/bracket assembly from the hub carrier and brake disc (there is no need to remove the brake pads) (see illustration) . Support the caliper/bracket assembly on an axle stand.
Unscrew the bolts securing the brake caliper mounting bracket to the hub carrier
6 Unscrew and remove the clamp nut and bolt securing the hub carrier to the lower arm balljoint – note that the bolt head is facing the front of the car. Push the end of the lower arm down to free the balljoint from the hub carrier (see illustrations). If the balljoint is very tight, it may be necessary to use a long lever or similar tool, but take care not to damage the balljoint rubber seal.
Unscrew the clamp nut and bolt securing the hub carrier to the lower arm balljoint . . .
. . . then push the end of the lower arm down to free the balljoint from the hub carrier
7 Unscrew the clamp bolt securing the hub carrier to the lower end of the suspension strut. Using a suitable lever, or a large screwdriver, spread the slot in the top of the hub carrier, until the hub carrier can be pulled from the end of the strut. If necessary, tap the hub carrier down to free it from the strut, using a soft-faced mallet. With the hub carrier released, support it on an axle stand making sure that the driveshaft joints are not bent excessively.
Caution: The inner driveshaft joint must not be bent more than 18° and the outer joint by more than 45°.
8 Support the strut then, working in the engine compartment, unscrew and remove the top mounting nut, using a ring spanner. Counterhold the strut piston rod using an Allen key. Lower the strut from the top mounting and withdraw it from under the wheel arch.
9 Remove the top mounting insulator from the body (see illustration) . Also remove the mounting cup from the top of the strut.
The top mounting insulator may be stuck in position under the wheel arch

Refitting

10 Refitting is a reversal of removal, bearing in mind the following points.
  1. Make sure that the slot for the clamp bolt in the strut aligns with the corresponding holes in the hub carrier (see illustration).
  2. Make sure that the top mounting insulator is correctly seated on the strut mounting in the engine compartment.
  3. Tighten the nuts and bolts to the specified torque.
Make sure that the slot (A) for the clamp bolt in the strut aligns with the holes (B) in the hub carrier
Torque wrench settings Nm Ibf ft
Anti-roll bar link nuts 51 38
Hub carrier-to-suspension strut clamp bolt 51 38
Roadwheel nuts 85 63
Suspension strut upper mounting nut 50 37
It is a similar procedure with the rear wheels. Check for wheel bearing movement, then remove the wheel
This model has drum brakes. Should the front brake pads need replacement, the rear drums should be checked for condition. The minimum brake shoe wear thickness is 1.0mm. If you need to replace the rear shoes, click below
- Close + Open

Rear brake shoes replacement

Warning: Brake shoes must be renewed on both rear wheels at the same time – NEVER renew the shoes on only one wheel, as uneven braking may result. Note that although Ford brake shoes do not contain asbestos, the dust created by wear of non-genuine shoes may be a health hazard. Do not use compressed air to blow out brake dust and debris – use a brush. Avoid inhaling any of the dust, and wear an approved filtration mask. Use only proprietary brake cleaner fluid or methylated spirits to clean the brake components, DO NOT use petrol or any other petroleum-based product as this will damage the rubber seals.
1 Working inside the car pull up the gaiter from the handbrake lever to expose the handbrake cable adjustment nut (see illustration) . Fully loosen the nut (but do not remove it) so that the rear brake shoes are fully retracted.
Unclip the handbrake lever gaiter from the floor
2 Chock the front wheels, then jack up the rear of the vehicle and support it on axle stands. Remove both rear roadwheels.
3 Unscrew the bolts securing the rear stub axle to the rear axle, then withdraw the stub axle together with the hub/brake drum over the brake shoes (see illustrations) . Note that the backplate and spacer plate are riveted to the rear axle. On models with ABS, take care not to damage the ABS sensor bolted to the backplate.
Bolts securing the rear stub axle to the rear axle
Removing the stub axle together with the hub/brake drum over the brake shoes
4 Working carefully, and taking the necessary precautions to avoid inhalation of dust, remove all traces of brake dust from the brake drum, backplate and shoes (see illustration) .
Rear brake shoes with the drum/hub removed
5 Measure the thickness of the friction material of each brake shoe at several points; if either shoe is worn at any point to 1.0 mm thickness or less, all four shoes must be renewed as a set. The shoes should also be renewed if any are fouled with oil or grease; there is no satisfactory way of degreasing friction material, once contaminated.
6 If either of the brake shoes are worn unevenly, or fouled with oil or grease, trace and rectify the cause before reassembly.
7 Note the position of each shoe, and the location of each of the springs. Also make a note of the self-adjuster component locations, to aid refitting later.
8 Using a pair of pliers, remove the shoe retainer springs by depressing and sliding them downwards, then withdraw the retainer pins from the brake backplate (see illustration) .
Rear brake shoes retainer spring
9 Ease the shoes out one at a time from the lower anchor point, to release the tension of the return spring, then disconnect the lower return spring from both shoes, using pliers if necessary (see illustration) .
Lower return spring
10 Ease the upper end of both shoes out from the wheel cylinder pistons, taking care not to damage the wheel cylinder seals, and disconnect the handbrake cable from the lever on the trailing shoe (see illustration) . The brake shoe and adjuster strut assembly can then be manoeuvred out of position and away from the backplate. Do not depress the brake pedal until the brakes are reassembled; fit a strong elastic band around the wheel cylinder pistons to retain them.
Handbrake cable connected to the lever on the trailing shoe
11 With the shoe and adjuster strut assembly on the bench, make a note of the correct fitted positions of the springs and adjuster strut, to use as a guide on reassembly. Unhook and remove the upper return spring then detach the leading shoe from the trailing shoe and strut assembly. Unhook the adjuster strut from the trailing shoe, and remove its spring, noting which way round it is fitted (see illustrations) .
Upper return spring location on the trailing shoe
Upper return spring location on the leading shoe
12 Carefully examine the adjuster strut assembly for signs of wear or damage, paying particular attention to the self-adjusting ratchet mechanism, and renew if necessary.
13 Depending on the brake shoes being installed, it may be necessary to remove the handbrake lever from the original trailing shoe, and install it on the new shoe. Secure the lever in position with a new retaining clip. All return springs should be renewed, regardless of their apparent condition. Note that spring kits are available from Ford dealers.
14 Fit the adjuster strut retaining spring to the trailing shoe, ensuring that the shorter hook of the spring is engaged with the shoe.
15 Fully extend the adjuster strut ratchet, then engage the adjuster strut with the leading shoe, and fully release the ratchet.
16 Attach the adjuster strut to the retaining spring on the trailing shoe, then ease the strut into position in its slot in the trailing shoe.
17 Hook the leading shoe onto the return spring, then manipulate the shoes until the return spring can be connected to the trailing shoe.
18 Remove the elastic band fitted to the wheel cylinder. Peel back the rubber protective caps, and check the wheel cylinder for fluid leaks or other damage. Also check that both cylinder pistons are free to move easily.
19 Prior to installation, clean the backplate and apply a thin smear of high-temperature brake grease to all those surfaces of the backplate which bear on the shoes, particularly the wheel cylinder pistons and lower anchor point. Do not use too much lubricant, and don’t allow the lubricant to foul the friction material.
20 Ensure that the adjuster strut self-adjust mechanism is fully released then manoeuvre the shoe and strut assembly into position and attach the handbrake cable to the lever on the trailing shoe. Engage the upper ends of both shoes with the wheel cylinder pistons, then fit the lower return spring to both shoes and ease the shoes into position on the lower anchor point.
21 Centralise the shoes relative to the backplate by tapping them. Refit the shoe retainer pins and secure them in position with the springs.
22 Locate the hub/brake drum and stub axle assembly over the brake shoes, then insert the retaining bolts and tighten to 66 Nm (49 Ibf ft).
23 Repeat the procedure on the remaining rear brake.
24 Refit the roadwheels, lower the car to the ground and tighten the roadwheel nuts to 85 Nm (63 Ibf ft). Adjust the lining-to-drum clearance by repeatedly depressing the brake pedal. Whilst doing this, have an assistant listen to the rear drums, to check that the adjuster strut is functioning correctly – a clicking sound should be emitted by the strut as the pedal is operated.
25 From the fully-released position, pull the handbrake lever up noting the number of clicks emitted from the handbrake ratchet mechanism. Position the handbrake lever on the sixth notch of the mechanism then slacken the adjusting nut until it rotates freely. Adjust the handbrake by tightening the adjuster nut to 4.0 Nm (3 lbf ft) then refit the gaiter (see illustration) .
Handbrake adjusting nut
26 Refit the handbrake lever gaiter.
Take a good look around brake system and the suspension arm, check for any leaks. Should the rear shock absorber need to be replaced, click below
- Close + Open

Rear suspension strut replacement

Removal

1 Remove the relevant rear wheel trim or the wheel centre plate (alloy wheels), then slacken the relevant rear wheel nuts. Chock the front wheels, then jack up the rear of the vehicle, and support on axle stands. Remove the rear roadwheel.
2 Open the tailgate and remove the rear parcel shelf.
3 Pull back the fabric trim panel.
4 Support the trailing arm using a trolley jack, then unscrew the strut top mounting nut inside the luggage compartment (see illustration) .
The rear strut top mounting
5 Unscrew the bolt securing the lower end of the strut assembly to the trailing arm, and withdraw the rear strut from the vehicle (see illustration) .
The rear strut lower securing bolt
6 Remove the top mounting insulator from the body.

Refitting

7 Refitting is a reversal of removal, bearing in mind the following points.
  1. Make sure that the top mounting insulator is correctly seated.
  2. Delay fully tightening the upper mounting nut and lower mounting bolt until the weight of the car is on the rear suspension.
  3. Tighten the roadwheel nuts to 85 Nm (63 Ibf ft).
Suspension strut upper mounting nut 34 Nm (25 Ibf ft)
Suspension strut lower mounting bolt 120 Nm (89 Ibf ft)
Check rubber exhaust mountings
Before refitting the tyres, take a look at the tyre tread, there is a UK legal requirement to have a minimum of 1.6mm remaining tread depth. Also check sidewalls for any kerb damage
Finally, check the condition of the spare wheel / emergency tyre repair system
All OnDemand jobs for your car
£0.00
1 year subscription

Already purchased this job? Log into your account to view