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Brakes, suspension & tyres Ford Mondeo 2003 - 2007 Diesel 2.2 TDCi

OnDemand step-by-step maintenance & repair BETA

Ford Mondeo 2003 - 2007  | 2.2 TDCi Brakes, suspension & tyres

  • time 20 minutes
  • difficulty 3
Start with the front wheels
With the wheel off the ground, check for wear in the wheel hub bearings by grasping the wheel and trying to rock it. Very slight play is OK, but if the movement is appreciable, you should seek further advice
Now remove the wheel
Check condition of the brake discs. Some light scoring is normal on the area in contact with the brake pads, but if heavy scoring and/or cracks are found on the disc or around the wheel bolt holes, the disc must be renewed. ALWAYS replace both front discs & pads
Now locate the brake pads, there are two, one on each side of the disc. Locate the brake pad's wearing surface, it's the wear material that is pressed against the brake disc to slow the vehicle when the brake pedal is applied
Using a ruler, measure the approximate thickness of the remaining wear material on the brake pad. If it is less than 2.0mm, all front pads need replacement. If you need to replace the front pads, click below
- Close + Open

Front brake pads replacement

1 Apply the handbrake, then jack up the front of the car and support it on axle stands. Remove both front roadwheels. Work on one brake assembly at a time, using the assembled brake for reference if necessary.
2 Push the piston into its bore by pulling the caliper outwards.
3 Unscrew and remove the caliper lower guide pin bolt, using a slim open-ended spanner to prevent the guide pin itself from rotating (see illustration) .
Unscrewing the caliper lower guide pin bolt
4 Pivot the caliper away from the brake pads and mounting bracket, and tie it to the suspension strut using a suitable piece of wire. If the upper guide pin bolt is also removed, do not allow the caliper to hang down by the hose (see illustration) .
Removing the caliper from the front brake pads
5 Withdraw the two brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket (see illustration) .
Removing the brake pads from the mounting bracket
6 First measure the thickness of each brake pad lining (see illustration) . If either pad is worn at any point to 1.5 mm thickness or less, all four pads must be renewed. Note that the pads are fitted with audible warning springs, which are designed to make a warning noise when the linings have reached their minimum thickness. The pads should also be renewed if any are fouled with oil or grease; note that there is no satisfactory way of degreasing friction material. If worn unevenly, or fouled with oil or grease, trace and rectify the cause before reassembly.
Measuring the thickness of the front brake pad linings
7 If the brake pads are still serviceable, carefully clean them using a clean, fine wire brush or similar, paying particular attention to the sides and back of the metal backing. Clean out the grooves in the friction material, and pick out any large embedded particles of dirt or debris. Carefully clean the pad locations in the caliper mounting bracket.
8 Prior to fitting the pads, check that the guide pins are free to slide easily in the caliper mounting bracket, and check that the rubber guide pin gaiters are undamaged. Brush the dust and dirt from the caliper and piston, but do not inhale it, as it is a health hazard. Scrape any corrosion from the edge of the disc, taking care not to damage the friction surface and inspect the disc for scoring and cracks. Inspect the dust seal around the piston for damage, and the piston for evidence of fluid leaks, corrosion or damage.
10 Ensuring that the friction material of each pad is against the brake disc, fit the pads to the caliper mounting bracket.
9 Smear a little high-temperature grease to the mounting bracket contract points on the pad backing plates.
11 The caliper piston must be pushed back into the caliper to make room for new pads – this may require considerable effort. Either use a G-clamp, sliding-jaw (water pump) pliers, or suitable pieces of wood as levers (see illustration) . Any brake fluid spilt on paintwork should be washed off with clean water without delay – brake fluid is a highly-effective paint-stripper.
Using a special tool to retract the caliper piston
12 As the piston is pushed back, the fluid level in the reservoir will rise, and possibly overflow. Keep an eye on the fluid level, and if necessary, syphon some off. Note: Do not syphon the fluid by mouth, as it is poisonous; use a syringe or an old antifreeze tester.
13 Locate the caliper over the pads, apply a little thread locking compound, then fit the guide pin bolts and tighten them to 30 Nm (22 Ibf ft) while retaining the guide pin with an open-ended spanner.
14 Depress the brake pedal repeatedly, until the pads are pressed into firm contact with the brake disc, and normal pedal pressure is restored.
15 Repeat the above procedure on the remaining front brake caliper.
16 Refit the roadwheels, then lower the car to the ground and tighten the roadwheel nuts to 85 Nm (63 Ibf ft).
17 Check the hydraulic fluid level.
HINT: New pads will not give full braking efficiency until they have bedded-in. Be prepared for this, and avoid hard braking as far as possible for the first hundred miles or so after pad renewal.
TIP! - Virtually all cars have this inspection window in the brake caliper body, you can usually see the brake pad thickness from here
Now quickly check all the brake pipes for condition, check for any leaks, also inspect the rubber gaitors for integrity. Seek advice should you detect a problem. Replace the wheel and repeat on the other side
It is a similar procedure with the rear wheels. Check for wheel bearing movement, then remove the wheel
Check condition of the rear brake discs
Locate rear brake pads...
Measure brake pad wear thickness. If it is less than 2.0mm, all rear pads need replacement. If you need to replace the rear pads, click below
- Close + Open

Rear brake pads replacement

1 Work on one brake assembly at a time, using the assembled brake for reference if necessary. Chock the front wheels, loosen the rear wheel nuts, then jack up the rear of the car and support on axle stands. Remove the rear wheels, then release the handbrake lever.

Models up to September 2004

2 To enable the caliper to pivot upwards for pad removal, the handbrake cable must be disconnected from the caliper. First push the lever forwards, then release the end of the inner cable from the fitting on the lever (see illustration) .
Disconnecting the handbrake inner cable from the rear caliper lever
3 Release the handbrake outer cable from the caliper bracket and position it to one side. Where a plastic ferrule is fitted to the outer cable, it will be necessary to compress the plastic tangs in order to release it from the bracket. Where a spring clip is fitted, pull it from the outer cable (see illustration) .
Disconnecting the handbrake cable from the caliper bracket
4 Unscrew and remove the caliper lower guide pin bolt (see illustration) . Swivel the caliper upwards, leaving the upper guide pin still entered in the caliper mounting bracket.
Remove the caliper lower guide pin bolt and swivel the caliper upwards
5 Remove the pads from the mounting bracket, noting their fitted positions (see illustrations) . Brush all dust and dirt from the caliper, pads and disc, but do not inhale it, as it may be harmful to health. Scrape any corrosion from the edge of the disc.
Remove the inner disc pad . . .
. . . followed by the outer disc pad
6 Apply a little copper-based brake grease to the contact areas on the pad backing plates (see illustration) , taking care not to get any on the friction material. Fit the new pads onto the mounting bracket, with the friction material facing the brake disc.
Apply a little copper-based brake grease to the contact areas on the pad backing plates
7 The self-adjusting piston must be retracted into the caliper, to allow room for the new pads (see illustration) . To do this, turn the piston fully into the caliper whilst also applying pressure to it, using an Allen key. On Saloon and Hatchback models, turn the piston anti-clockwise when working on the right-hand rear caliper, and clockwise when working on the left-hand rear caliper. On Estate models, turn the piston anti-clockwise when working on the left-hand rear caliper, and clockwise when working on the right-hand rear caliper.
The self-adjusting piston must be retracted into the caliper to allow room for the new pads
Caution: Pushing back the piston causes a reverse-flow of brake fluid, which has been known to ‘flip’ the master cylinder rubber seals, resulting in a total loss of braking. To avoid this, clamp the caliper flexible hose and open the bleed screw – as the piston is pushed back, the fluid can be directed into a suitable container using a hose attached to the bleed screw. Close the screw just before the piston is pushed fully back, to ensure no air enters the system.
8 With the piston screwed in fully, centralise the correct cut-out on the piston with the raised mark on the caliper as shown (see illustrations) . On the left-hand rear caliper, the ‘short’ cut-out must align with the mark, whereas, on the right-hand rear caliper, the ‘long’ cut-out must align with the mark. Note that the ‘pips’ on the outer faces of the brake pads locate in these cut-outs.
On the left-hand rear caliper, the ‘short’ cut-out must align with the raised mark . . .
. . . but on the right-hand rear caliper, the ‘long’ cut-out must align with the mark
Piston alignment on the left-hand rear caliper . . .
. . . and right-hand rear caliper
9 Swivel the caliper down. Apply a little locking fluid to the threads of the lower guide pin bolt, then tighten it to 30 Nm (22 Ibf ft).
10 Refit the handbrake outer cable to the bracket, making sure that it is locked firmly in position.
11 Push the handbrake lever forwards, then hook the inner cable on the fitting, and release the lever.

Models from September 2004

12 Unscrew and remove both the rear caliper guide pin bolts, and lift the caliper off the pads and mounting bracket (see illustrations) . Note how the handbrake cable sits, so the caliper can be refitted correctly.
Unscrew the caliper guide pin bolts . . .
. . . and lift the caliper off the pads
13 The self-adjusting piston must be retracted into the caliper, to allow room for the new pads. To do this, turn the piston fully into the caliper whilst also applying pressure to it. Ford dealers use a special tool (206-085) which has two prongs to engage the two indents in the piston – if this tool is not available, various tool companies sell suitable substitutes (see illustration) . Since the piston must be pressed back with some force, experience has shown that using pliers for this task rarely works.
Wind the piston back into the caliper using a tool designed for this purpose
14 On Saloon and Hatchback models, turn the piston anti-clockwise when working on the right-hand rear caliper, and clockwise when working on the left-hand rear caliper. On Estate models, turn the piston anti-clockwise when working on the left-hand rear caliper, and clockwise when working on the right-hand rear caliper.
15 When the piston is fully retracted, set the piston indents in the central vertical position, relative to the caliper (see illustration) . The back of the inner pad has a raised nib which must sit inside one of the piston indents when the caliper is refitted.
Showing the caliper piston retracted, with the two indents set ‘vertically’
16 Using a piece of wire, string, or cable ties, suspend the caliper so that the flexible hose and handbrake cable are not under strain.
17 Note the positions of the brake pads in the mounting bracket – the inner pad has a chamfered front (leading) edge, and the outer pad has a shim (which should be removed and re-used if a new one is not supplied with the pads). Remove the pads from the bracket (see illustrations) .
Unclip the outer . . .
. . . and the inner pad from the mounting bracket
18 With the pads removed, check the condition of the shims in the mounting bracket – the long tangs should face away from the brake disc.
19 Fit the inner pad (which has a chamfered leading edge) into the mounting bracket. Note any arrows showing the forward direction of rotation. Rest the pad on the retaining spring’s long tang, then press it downwards and twist the pad into place.
20 Refit the caliper over the pads, making sure that the handbrake cable is routed as before, and is not kinked, twisted or stretched. Refit the guide pin bolts, and tighten them to 30 Nm (22 Ibf ft).

All models

21 Repeat the procedure on the remaining rear brake, then refit the rear wheels and lower the car to the ground. Tighten the wheel nuts to 85 Nm (63 Ibf ft).
22 Firmly depress the brake pedal a few times, to bring the pads to their normal working position. Check the level of the brake fluid in the reservoir, and top-up if necessary.
23 Give the car a road test, to make sure that the brakes are functioning correctly, and to bed-in the new linings to the contours of the disc. Remember that full braking efficiency will not be obtained until the new linings have bedded-in, and if possible, avoid heavy braking for the first few hundred miles.
Take a good look around brake system and the suspension arm, check for any leaks. Should the rear shock absorber need to be replaced, click below
- Close + Open

Rear shock absorber replacement

Removal

1 Loosen the rear wheel nuts. Chock the front wheels, then jack up the rear of the car and support on axle stands. Remove the relevant rear wheel.
2 Position a trolley jack under the coil spring area of the rear lower arm, to keep the coil spring in compression.
3 Unscrew and remove the shock absorber lower mounting bolt (see illustration) .
Removing the shock absorber lower mounting bolt (Estate)
4 Unscrew and remove the upper mounting bolt, and withdraw the shock absorber from under the car. Access to the upper bolt is difficult, and a socket drive with universal joint may be required (see illustration) .
Access to the shock absorber upper bolt is difficult

Testing

5 Check the mounting rubbers for damage and deterioration. If they are worn, the complete shock absorber must be renewed, as they are not available separately.
6 Mount the shock absorber in a vice, gripping it by the lower mounting. Examine the shock absorber for signs of fluid leakage. Test the operation of the shock absorber by moving it through a full stroke, and then through short strokes of 50 to 100 mm. In both cases, the resistance felt should be smooth and continuous. If the resistance is jerky or uneven, the shock absorber should be renewed.

Refitting

7 Refitting is a reversal of the removal procedure, however, do not fully tighten the mounting bolts to the specified torque until the full weight of the car is on its suspension. Note that on models fitted with load-levelling shock absorbers, the tab on the upper mounting must point outwards.
Roadwheel nuts Nm Ibf ft
  All models 85 63
Shock absorber lower mounting bolt 120 89
Shock absorber lower mounting to tie-bar/knucle 120 89
Shock absorber upper mounting bolt 84 62
Shock absorber upper mounting to crossmember 84 62
Check the rubber exhaust mountings
Before refitting the tyres, take a look at the tyre tread, there is a UK legal requirement to have a minimum of 1.6mm remaining tread depth. Also check sidewalls for any kerb damage
Finally, check the condition of the spare wheel / emergency tyre repair system