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6 things you'd only know about the Ford Fiesta (2002-2008 models) by taking it apart

6 things you'd only know about the Ford Fiesta (2002-2008 models) by taking it apart

The Ford Fiesta is a motoring mainstay. It’s the go-to small car for millions of drivers, it can regularly be found at the top end of the best-seller charts and it’s a car that we all love. The Fiesta is all things to all motorists, which is why we’ve had it from the 1970s through to today, with no signs of it going away anytime soon.

The model we’re looking at here the fifth-generation model. This was the Fiesta that ushered in a new level of build quality and refinement for Ford’s small car. Prior to this sturdy model, some accused the Fiesta of being a bit flimsy or a bit cheap.

This generation put paid to those comments. Sturdier though it may have been, it was and still is a mechanically approachable car, but even so, so insider information never hurts…

Oil Filter

Oil Filter

When changing the oil filter element on diesel engines, the plastic lug on the base of the filter must align with the corresponding hole in the housing. If it’s not, the lug could snap off and the debris could enter the oil supply circuit, and that has the potential to cause serious damage, so check it twice, fit it once.

Camshaft TDC

When setting the camshaft at TDC for No.1 cylinder on the 1.3 Duratec engine, place a set-square on the camshaft bearing cap to provide an alignment reference for the timing mark on the camshaft sprocket. This way, you will ensure that everything is lined up as it should be.

Camshaft locking

If you’re doing some regular maintenance to the timing gear on the 1.4 Duratoq TDCi engine, don’t be suckered into buying an expensive locking tool. You can lock the crankshaft and the camshaft in place by using something as simple as a 5mm and 8mm drill bit.

Oil Pump Gasket

Oil Pump Gasket

On Duratec 8v engines, the coolant pump gasket is attached to the oil pump gasket. When renewing the pump, you’ll have no choice but to cut off the old gasket. Make  sure the mounting face is cleared of any old debris before fitting the new gasket.

Inertia Switch

Inertia Switch

On petrol engines, the fuel-cut off valve/inertia switch is behind the glovebox. It is a sensitive little thing, and can be triggered, thus stopping the car, by driving over rough ground. If this happens, you just need to press it and the car will work again.

Banjo Bolt

Banjo Bolt

On 1.4 litre diesel engines, a small filter is incorporated into the oil supply pipe banjo bolt. Always change the bolt when renewing the turbocharger. Don’t use the old one, as this may be blocked, and thus could starve your new turbo of oil, bringing you expensively back to square one.

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