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VW Polo Mk5 common problems (2009-2017)

VW Polo

The world is an expensive place. No matter what you’re buying, you’re probably paying more this week than you did last week. And the same applies with running your VW Polo Mk5: fuel is up, parts prices are up, and garage labour rates are up as everyone feels the cost of high inflation.

So, now’s the time to save cash by fixing your Polo yourself, which where Haynes comes in.

We can tell you the main problems you’re likely to encounter with it, and we can show you how to sort them out yourself, which means you get the satisfaction of doing it yourself, and save a load of money in the process.

 

VW Polo

What recalls has the VW Polo Mk5 been subject to?

The Polo has been recalled once or twice in its time on Earth.

One recall concerned the 1.2-litre engine, and was caused by loose camshaft adjuster bolt that could cause a broken pulley.

Airbags that could suddenly go off unexpectedly, despite the vehicle not being involved in a crash caused another recall.

The Polo was dragged back to dealer for an incorrectly welded towing eye, while some cars were recalled for faulty seat-backrest welding.

Child safety locks that could disengage without warning, allowing the rear doors to opened from the inside, prompted a recall of more than 13,000 Polos.

 

What common problems does the Volkswagen Polo Mk5 have?

Oil leaks from the area where the engine and gearbox meet are known to afflict the Volkswagen Polo with the 1.4-litre TDI engine fitted.

The same engine can be afflicted by a faulty timing belt adjuster, which needs to be replaced.

The front brakes have also been the source of the odd problem, because they can emit a creaking or clicking noise under use. The cause is a combination of faulty brake pads and faulty brake caliper carriers.

Parking sensors have been another source of problems, because connections have been known to corrode. And there’s an issue that causes the interior lights to malfunction, and for noise to emanate from the dashboard.

Don’t worry though, because these issues are all pretty straightforward to put right. Just stick to the step-by-step guide in your Haynes Polo Mk5 manual and Autofix.

VW Polo

Does the VW Polo Mk5 have timing system problems?

The VW Polo fitted with the 1.4-litre TDI engine can sometime emit a noise from beneath the bonnet when started from cold.

The problem can be either a worn auxiliary drivebelt, which is a five-minute job to swap. Or it can be a worn timing belt and faulty timing belt adjuster. First of all, remove the auxiliary drivebelt and start the engine. If the noise disappears, the auxiliary belt is at fault. If not, it’s the timing belt and adjuster, which will need to be replaced – and soon.

However, this entire task is covered fully in the Haynes Polo Mk5 manual and Autofix, so just take a deep breath and follow the steps. You’ll be fine.

Volkswagen Polo

Does the VW Polo Mk5 have oil leak problems?

Again, this issue afflicts Polos with the 1.4-litre TDI engine. There can sometime be a small oil leak from the area that the engine block and the gearbox meet.

The culprit is a set of faulty flywheel bolts, so you’ll need to remove them, clean the threads and fit new bolts.

The Haynes Polo Mk5 manual and Autofix can guide you through this comparatively straightforward procedure.

VW Polo

Does the Polo Mk5 have brake problems?

Again, this issue afflicts Polos with the 1.4-litre TDI engine. There can sometime be a small oil leak from the area that the engine block and the gearbox meet.

The culprit is a set of faulty flywheel bolts, so you’ll need to remove them, clean the threads and fit new bolts.

The Haynes Polo Mk5 manual and Autofix can guide you through this comparatively straightforward procedure.

Does the VW Polo Mk5 have parking sensor problems?

The parking sensor system on the Volkswagen Polo Mk5 can occasionally fail. The most common cause is a poor electrical connection in the rear of the sensor itself.

To find out which sensor is at fault, plug in a fault-code reader to the OBD port, and the code will reveal the affected sensor. The codes are B1076, B107E, B10F6, B10F7, B10F8, B10F9, B1077, B1078, B1079, B107A, B107D, B10FA, B10FB, B1150, B1151, B1152, B1153, B1377.

Once you’ve identified the sensor with the issue, simply remove the relevant bumper, clean up the connection and check the wiring, then replace.

Again, the Haynes Polo Mk5 manual and Autofix will help you throughout this procedure.

 

VW Polo

Does the VW Polo Mk5 have electrical problems?

There have been reports of an issue in the Polo Mk5 that causes the interior lights to malfunction, the boot light to fail, and noises to emanate from the dashboard.

But the issue lies not within the dashboard, but instead with the sun visor vanity light, which can become faulty.

If you plug in a fault-code reader and it generates the code B1314, then the vanity light is the cause.

Thereafter, it’s just a case of disconnecting the battery, removing the affected sunvisor and checking all the connections, and repairing if necessary.

After that, just clear the fault codes and you’ll be good to go.

And the good news is that the Haynes Polo Mk5 manual and Autofix will be with you every step of the way.